WN conference

Below, the first paragraphs of “After the Fall,” a recent American Renaissance article: The National Policy Institute (NPI) held its second national conference in Washington, DC, on October 26, with a very interesting lineup of speakers. The meeting was held in the Ronald Reagan Center, a federally operated facility, which resisted all “anti-racist” threats to…

Continue reading

March of the Titans

The following paragraphs of March of the Titans: The Complete History of the White Race by Arthur Kemp caught my attention:   The Third Reich Hitler and the Third Reich remain one of the most difficult historical areas with which to come to grips. The reason for this is that Hitler still has a massive…

Continue reading

Monocausalism – requiescat in pace

Today, in “Recently in The Occidental Quarterly: Special Sections on White Pathology”, Kevin MacDonald wrote:   This is an introduction to special sections in the Summer and Fall issues of The Occidental Quarterly focused on White pathology. Whatever blame for our situation that we place on others, the bottom line is that we are allowing…

Continue reading

John Tyndall (1934-2005)

Or: Before the BNP betrayed itself “The day that our followers lose their ability to hate will be the day that they lose their power and their will to achieve anything worthwhile at all.” —John Tyndall   Don’t miss British Paul Hickman’s premier radio-podcast aired today in a show that has been baptized “Voice of…

Continue reading

Non-nazis are evil

“Men are the devils of the earth, and the animals are its tormented souls.” —Arthur Schopenhauer   Why evil? Because they allowed the more malevolent races to exist and breed and even conquer large parts of the world. Hadn’t most whites become accomplices of the greatest crime of all history, that we might start calling…

Continue reading

Parable of the talents

In my previous post on exterminable non-whites and White sin I evoked the New Testament’s Parable of the talents in a way that might need further explanation. And what better explanation than quoting John Milton, who was fascinated by the parable (Matthew 25:24-30) and referred to it repeatedly, as in the sonnet “On His Blindness”:…

Continue reading