Another TV abomination

Once again, I have watched the first season of a television series, The Borgias, about the rise of the Borgia family to the pinnacle of the Church and their struggles to maintain their grip on power.

The_Borgias

When I was a child I found inspiring the films of the Renaissance period that I saw on the big screen, like The Agony and the Ecstasy starring Charlton Heston. That movie, released in 1965, stressed the positive sides of the papacy of Pope Julius II—positive and inspiring when compared to the series about the Borgias. The 2011 series focuses not only on the negative side but on the filthiest and most repulsive aspects of the period. The creators even lied about historical matters to paint the corrupted Borgias in blacker tones than the historical Borgias.

For instance Prince Cem, a sultan who died in 1495 while in the custody of the French king (not of the Pope as in the series), was probably not murdered and Lucrezia Borgia’s dowry had nothing to do with Cem’s death. The recent series even portray Cem as a nice, adolescent chap whose character contrasts dramatically with the evil Italians and for whom Lucrezia feels deep affection, if not love. In real history, the Pope tried to convert Cem to Christianity without success. In the fictionalized series Cem himself wants to convert to Christianity, but is murdered by the ruthless Borgias.

Obviously, like all historical series done in recent years, The Borgias is plagued with sex scenes, and Cesare Borgia says about an Amerind brought by Christopher Columbus that the poor Indian was extracted from a paradise of noble savages. (Obviously, on TV there’s no mention that the historical Amerinds were cannibals who sacrificed their own children.)

It’s without saying that seeing how millions of euros have been spent in the production of this luxurious filth makes me sick. It also corroborates how far whites are gone…