The total triumph of Christianity

These days, once again, the tragedy of James Watson, one of the most famous scientists in the world for having been one of the discoverers of the molecular structure of DNA, has come to public attention.

For having accepted that IQ is differential among human races, currently Watson is treated as a pariah in his country to the extent that he had to sell his gold medal awarded to him in the Nobel Prize ceremony of 1962.

I’ve talked about the Mexican film Roma, which is being hugely acclaimed in national and international film circles. Time magazine ranked the Mexican Indian as the best performance of 2018. This Indian woman whom the director Alfonso Cuarón used had no experience as an actress before Roma (her parents are of indigenous origin; she speaks the Mixtec language). But this Indian has been catapulted to fame by the mere fact of having starred in the Cuarón movie. She is even doing tours in the United States where, through a translator, they interview her.

In the words that the gospel attributes to Jesus, the last shall be the first and the first the last. When in 1968 I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey I imagined that in the world of the future only whites, like those that appear in the film, would conquer space and make the leap to overman (this is the message of the film that used the symphonic poem of Richard Strauss, Thus Spake Zarathustra, inspired in Nietzsche’s book of the same title). Who would have said that in the 21st century the exact opposite would occur!: the neighbouring country of the north would marginalise one of its best scientists to the degree that he suffers economic hardship and sold his medal, and it would catapult the career of a Mexican Indian whose mother tongue is not even Spanish.

The triumph of Christianity over the Aryan mind, the inversion of values that Nietzsche so much warned about, is now total: absolute.