Paleologic modes of cognition

If there is something that bothers me in the forums of the racialist dissidents, it is the abundance of conspiracy theories right after attacks like the one in New Zealand the previous week. However, as I have decided not to read these forums anymore, but rather to convert this site into a platform for disseminating National Socialism, today I will present my conclusions without dwelling on the subject with due detail.

I believe that conspiracy theories, inside and outside of white nationalism, have to do with the immaturity of the human mind in the sense of archaic atavisms: what Silvano Arieti (1914-1981) called ‘paleologic thought’: a phenomenon that I explained in Day of Wrath.

In addition to a few more articles critical of psychiatry that I still have to translate, it occurs to me to start a new series, based on Arieti’s texts, explaining the paleological thought in greater detail than Day of Wrath. For the moment, suffice it to say that the paleologician reasons in a similar way to that of the schizophrenic although, unlike the latter, the former can function reasonably well in modern society.

It is fundamental to understand schizophrenia in general to comprehend why, during lone-wolf attacks similar to last week’s, the most bizarre conspiracy theories immediately crop up like fungi.

The university faculties do not understand schizophrenia insofar as they study it under the pseudo-scientific medical model of mental disorders. But the work of Arieti and others opens the door to the inner world of the schizophrenic, which sometimes seems indistinguishable from the most regressive aspects of the urban myths of today.