Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 6

Night of the 22nd-23rd July 1941   Steps towards a durable understanding between Germany and Britain—Dearth of philosophic and artistic sense of the British.     I believe that the end of this war will mark the beginning of a durable friendship with England. But first we must give her the k.o.—for only so can…

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Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 72

  Night of 24th-25th January 1942 Origin of Tristan and Isolda—Cosima Wagner—Wahnfried—The Makart style—Bayreuth—On the Nuremberg Congress.     Whatever one says, Tristan is Wagner’s masterpiece, and we owe Tristan to the love Mathilde Wesendonck inspired in him. She was a gentle, loving woman, but far from having the qualities of Cosima. Nobody like Wagner…

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Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 98

  Night of 28th February-1st March 1942 The Bayreuth Festival 1925—Bayreuth and National Socialism—Rôle of Frau Wagner—Siegfried Wagner. In 1925, the Bechsteins had invited me to stay with them in Bayreuth. They lived in a villa in the Liszt Strasse (I think this was the name of the street), within a few yards of Wahnfried.…

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Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 126

  Berghof, 1st May 1942, midday Architectural problems—Our architects must plan on a grand scale—Bayreuth, Weimar and Dresden—Development of cultural life. I am very grateful to Professor Giesler for having so successfully transformed the Schloss Kiessheim, which is to be our Guest House for distinguished visitors and which was opened in its new rôle by…

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Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 127

  3rd May 1942, at dinner Berlin must not monopolise the resources of the Reich—Berlin is not an artistic city—The choice of Nuremberg.   When I think of Bayreuth, I am invariably worried by the thought that one day we may have to appeal to the State for financial aid for the maintenance of its…

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