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Karlheinz Deschner died in 2014, a year after he published the tenth volume of his Criminal History of Christianity, which he had begun more than twenty-five years before, after seventeen other preparatory studies. Throughout the nearly five thousand pages of the German edition translated into several languages—but curiously not into English except for the abridged…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 100

Below, an abridged translation from the third volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums. Most of the written statements about the martyrs are false, but all of them were considered as totally valid historical documents (7 of 7) Although the number of Christian martyrs in the first three centuries could be calculated at 1,500 (a…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 99

Below, an abridged translation from the third volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums. Most of the written statements about the martyrs are falsified, but all of them were considered as totally valid historical documents (6 of 7) It only remains to say that we are not talking about pious legends, but about written statements,…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 98

Below, an abridged translation from the third volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums.   Most of the martyrs’ acts are falsified, but all of them were considered as totally valid historical documents (5 of 7) Following the above examples, as many Christian heroes could have died as the writer wanted. Let us compare the…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 97

Below, an abridged translation from the third volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums.   Most of the written statements about the martyrs are false, but all of them were considered as totally valid historical documents (4 of 7) Mar Jacob, the one tear into pieces, after the ten fingers of the hands and three…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 96

Below, an abridged translation from the third volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums.   Most of the written statements about the martyrs are false, but all of them were considered as totally valid historical documents (3 of 7) But precisely the bishops—whose martyrdom was considered ‘something special’ before that of ordinary Christians—very rarely were…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 95

Below, an abridged translation from the third volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums.   Most of the written statements about the martyrs are false, but all of them were considered as totally valid historical documents (2 of 7) The tolerance of the Romans in religious matters was generally great. They had it before the…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 93

Below, an abridged translation from the second volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums.   As the historical-critical exegesis of the Bible teaches us, Jesus—the apocalyptic man who, totally within the tradition of the Jewish prophets, waits for the immediate end: the irruption of the ‘God’s imperial rule’, and thereby makes a complete mistake (one…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 92

Fourth century glass mosaic of St. Peter, located at the Catacombs of Saint Thecla.   Below, an abridged translation from the second volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums. The story of the discovery of Peter’s tomb According to an ancient tradition, the tomb of the ‘prince of the apostles’ is on the Appian Way,…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 91

Below, an abridged translation from the second volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums.   There is no evidence of Peter’s stay and death in Rome Nor was he ever the bishop of Rome. It is an absurd idea, but it is the basis of a whole doctrine that the popes and their theologians literally…

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