Kriminalgeschichte, 49

Below, an abridged translation from the first volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums (Criminal History of Christianity). For a single online book that explains the importance of the subject of the destruction of the Greco-Roman world by Judeo-Christians, see here. In a nutshell, any white person who worships the god of the Jews is,…

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Apocalypse for whites • XXXI

by Evropa Soberana The destruction of the Greco-Roman World – 1 (Fourth century) After the Council of Nicaea, Christianity reaches a doctrinal uniformity that unifies the diverse factions, and acquires a legal administrative character, like a state within the State. Nicaea, incidentally, is a city in the province of Bithynia, Asia Minor (now Turkey). Constantine…

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Kriminalgeschichte, 46

The Council of Nicaea, with Arius depicted as defeated by the council, lying under the feet of Emperor Constantine. ______ 卐 ______ Below, abridged translation from the first volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums (Criminal History of Christianity)   The Council of Nicaea and the profession of ‘Constantinian’ faith Constantine had recommended the place,…

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Kriminalgeschichte, 44

Below, abridged translation from the first volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums (Criminal History of Christianity) Athanasius at the Council of Nicea   Chapter 18: Athanasius, Doctor of the Church (towards 295-373) ‘Saint Athanasius was the greatest man of his time and perhaps, pondering everything in a scrupulous way, the greatest that the Church…

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Kriminalgeschichte, 32

Editor’s note: The author states below: ‘This provision [by Constantine] had serious consequences, as it was one of the first to deprive Jews, in practice, of owning farms’. This is how the first seeds were planted for the Jews to do what today is called ‘white collar’ jobs. In the days of Ancient Rome the…

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Julian, 11

Julian presiding at a conference of Sectarians (Edward Armitage, 1875)   We were nominally in the charge of Bishop George of Cappadocia who lived at Caesarea. He visited us at least once a month, and it was he who insisted that our education be essentially Galilean. “Because there is no reason why you should not…

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