Christianity’s Criminal History, 77

Below, an abridged translation from the third volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums.   The Jewish apocalyptic The apocalyptic genre (from the Greek apokálypsis) plays an important role, a kind of transitional role from the Old to the New Testament, especially in the epoch that goes from the 3rd century BC to the 2nd…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 76

Below, an abridged translation from the third volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums.   The same as the work of Isaiah, the book of Ezekiel, written almost all in the first person, unites prophecies of misfortunes and beatitudes, reprimands and threats with tempting hymns and omens. For a long time it was considered the…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 72

Below, an abridged translation from the third volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums.   Fabrications in the Old Testament The boldest, daring and of greatest consequence of this type was to attribute to the spirit and dictation of God all the writings of the Old and New Testaments. —Arnold Meyer   The bibles of…

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Apocalypse for whites • VI

by Evropa Soberana ‘When the Macedonians seized power [in Judea], King Antiochus sought to extirpate their superstitions and introduce Greek habits to transform that inferior race’. —Tacitus, History   The Hellenistic legacy To understand the virulent ethnic conflicts that occurred during the Roman domination, it is necessary to go back a few years and place…

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Antiochus

Greek effigy coin of Antiochus IV Epiphanes A couple of days ago I resuscitated the idea of adding here further excerpts from the monumental Criminal History of Christianity. Four years ago I purposely left those excerpts with a short entry because Deschner’s last sentence provided much food for thought: “If the stringent measures against the…

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Gospel Fictions, 7

  Below, part of Gospel Fictions’ seventh chapter, “Resurrection fictions” by Randel Helms (ellipsis omitted between unquoted passages):   The earliest extended statement about the Easter experiences appears not in the Gospels but in Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians. It dates from the early 50’s, some twenty years after the crucifixion. Paul’s statement is…

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