Only six books

Twelve days ago I said that John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty was one of the very few books that, from the academic canon imposed by the faculties of philosophy, I find readable. But I failed to mention the other five. Plato is boring but I find amusing the Memorabilia, in which Xenophon illustrates more piquaresquely…

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Mill’s quote

Or: Conspiracy theories in white nationalism   This is a postscript of what I said yesterday about Richard Spencer and friends on the subject of John F. Kennedy’s assassination by Oswald—and by Oswald alone. My trouble with white nationalists is not only that they are inferior to the National Socialists on all counts. Many of…

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Liberalism, 16

Classical and modern Enlightenment philosophers are given credit for shaping liberal ideas. Thomas Hobbes attempted to determine the purpose and the justification of governing authority in a post-civil war England. Employing the idea of a state of nature—a hypothetical war-like scenario prior to the State—he constructed the idea of a social contract which individuals enter…

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Liberalism, 11

Social liberalism By the end of the nineteenth century, the principles of classical liberalism were being increasingly challenged by downturns in economic growth, a growing perception of the evils of poverty, unemployment and relative deprivation present within modern industrial cities, and the agitation of organized labor. The ideal of the self-made individual, who through hard…

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Liberalism, 9

Classical liberalism The development into maturity of classical liberalism took place before and after the French Revolution in Britain, and was based on the following core concepts: classical economics, free trade, laissez-faire government with minimal intervention and taxation and a balanced budget. Classical liberals were committed to individualism, liberty and equal rights. The primary intellectual…

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On Buddha & Evola

Or: “The existence of Buddhism should scare the White Nationalists who can’t think of anything but Jews” by Cesar Tort In a previous post I talked about my golden rule: never read those authors or philosophers who write in obscure prose. I confess that, in the past, when I was researching the pseudoscience called psychiatry,…

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