Christianity’s Criminal History, 114

St. John Chrysostom exhorting Aelia Eudoxia. Note how the Empress—the spouse of the Roman Emperor Arcadius—, in this painting by Jean-Paul Laurens, has people in her Byzantine entourage who are not whites. Editor’s note: In a nationalist forum last month a commenter said: A BS narrative that makes no sense. The idea that Jews created Christianity to…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 113

 Editors’ note:To contextualise these translations of Karlheinz Deschner’s encyclopaedic history of the Church in 10-volumes, Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums, read the abridged translationof Volume I. The Catholic ‘children emperors’ ‘These sovereigns followed the examples of the great Theodosius’. —Cardinal Hergenrother, Church Historian ‘The emperors were also pious Catholics’. —Peter Brown ‘The world is sinking’. —St Jerome  The division…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 112

Editor’s note: Here we see once again some passages on the historical Libanius: a central character in Gore Vidal’s Julian. What Deschner says here about Libanius is splendidly novelized by Vidal in the very final paragraph of his novel. To contextualise these translations of Karlheinz Deschner’s encyclopaedic history of the Church in 10-volumes, Kriminalgeschichte des…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 111

 Editors’ note: To contextualise these translations of Karlheinz Deschner’s encyclopaedic history of the Church in 10-volumes, Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums, read the abridged translation of Volume I.   Everything a person needs to know is contained in the Bible Augustine’s intellectual achievements—which are of a theological nature—have been always overrated. With the exception of certain psychological…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 110

(Iconic image of Tatian) Editors’ note: To contextualise these translations of Karlheinz Deschner’s encyclopaedic history of the Church in 10-volumes, Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums, read the abridged translation of Volume I.   Natural Science Even geometry seemed disgraceful to Christians. Still at the beginning of the 4th century they refused to make bishop the Christian Nemesius…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 109

Editor’s Note: The spirit of Jorge of Burgos There are two ways to learn about the history that the school hid us. The most enjoyable is to read novels like Julian by Gore Vidal, located in the 4th century AD; the other to study arid scholarly treatises by dissenters like Karlheinz Deschner. What Deschner says…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 108

 Editors’ note: ‘One cannot solve the Jewish question without first solving the Christian Question’, said commenter Devan in the previous thread. Isn’t it truly pathetic that, the only ones who want to defend the white race in the world, continue defending the religion that weakened the Aryan race against the Jews? I recently said in…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 107

 Editors’ note: To contextualise these translations of Karlheinz Deschner’s encyclopaedic history of the Church in 10-volumes, Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums, read the abridged translation of Volume I.   The theatre, ‘The temple of the devil’ Almost unanimously (with very few exceptions, such as those of Victorinus of Pettau and Gaius Marius Victorinus), the Fathers of the…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 106

 Editors’ note: To contextualise these translations of Karlheinz Deschner’s encyclopaedic history of the Church in 10-volumes, Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums, read the abridged translation of Volume I.   The hostility to classic culture in early Christian Latin writers The fact that also ecclesiastical authors imbued with philosophy disqualify or hate the latter is something that is…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 105

 Editors’ note: To contextualise these translations of Karlheinz Deschner’s encyclopaedic history of the Church in 10-volumes, Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums, read the abridged translation of Volume I.   The hostility to the classic culture of the first Greco-Christian writers We already showed above how decidedly, with what resolutely rude expressions, Tatian, the ‘philosopher of the barbarians’,…

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