Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 72

  Night of 24th-25th January 1942 Origin of Tristan and Isolda—Cosima Wagner—Wahnfried—The Makart style—Bayreuth—On the Nuremberg Congress.     Whatever one says, Tristan is Wagner’s masterpiece, and we owe Tristan to the love Mathilde Wesendonck inspired in him. She was a gentle, loving woman, but far from having the qualities of Cosima. Nobody like Wagner…

Continue reading

Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 118

  22nd April 1942, midday The Metropolitan Opera House in New York closes its doors—The Americans have no great artistes. It is reported that the Metropolitan Opera House in New York is to be closed; but the reasons given for its closing are certainly false. The Americans do not lack money; what they lack is…

Continue reading

Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 125

  Berghof, 30th April 1942, at dinner German tenors—The horror of Bruno Walter and Knappertsbusch—Furtwängler, the only real conductor. I am very sorry that Germany at the moment possesses only two really first-class tenors, for these two unfortunates are forced to tear round and round the country singing in town after town with neither rest…

Continue reading

Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 159

  1st August 1942, evening British lies—A comparison with America—The Church’s cunning wisdom—Exit the Pope. Conversation turned to a book entitled Juan in America which Bormann had recently lent to the Fuehrer. In it the author paints a picture of the unbelievable conditions which reigned in the intellectual and political circles of the United States,…

Continue reading

Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 181

  1st September 1942, evening Vienna before 1918—and after.   After 1918 the average Viennese found himself reduced to extreme poverty. But before the war it was wonderful; never shall I forget the gracious spectacle of the Vienna Opera, the women sparkling with diadems and fine clothes. In 1922 I was again at the Opera—and…

Continue reading

Uncle Adolf’s table talk, 186

  13th June 1943, evening The French painters—The great artistic achievements of the nineteenth century were German—Architecture in Munich.   I cannot make up my mind to buy a picture by a French painter, because I am not sure of the dividing line between what I understand and what I do not understand. I have…

Continue reading

Dresden: death from above

by Tom Sunic Originally published in The Occidental Observer Image of Dresden during the 1890s before extensive World War II destruction What follows below is the English translation of my speech in German which I was scheduled to deliver on February 13, 2013, around 7:00 PM in downtown Dresden. The commemoration of the Dresden February…

Continue reading

Alberich’s Revenge

For those who liked a featured article I reproduced here under the title “Wagner’s wisdom,” Michael Colhaze has now written another piece on Wagner, but this time about “Barbarians who seem to lack any access to Beauty’s divine joy, and therefore hate it, and thus try to destroy what they can’t have.” However relevant to…

Continue reading

Léon Degrelle’s “The Enigma of Hitler”

Léon Degrelle was a Belgian Rexist leader, SS officer, decorated combatant on the Eastern Front. Of the first eight hundred Walloon volunteers who left for the Axis campaign against the Soviet Union and Stalinist Marxism, only three survived the war—one of them Degrelle. He died in 1994, while still in exile in Spain. “Hitler—you knew…

Continue reading