Christianity’s Criminal History, 102

Editors’ note: To contextualise these translations of Karlheinz Deschner’s encyclopaedic history of the Church in 10-volumes, Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums, read the abridged translation of Volume I. In the previous chapter, not translated for this site, the author describes the high level of education in the Greco-Roman world before the Christians burned entire libraries and destroyed…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 89

Below, an abridged translation from the third volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums.   Interpolations in the New Testament Christians were very fond of interpolations. They have constantly modified, reduced and expanded the New Testament writings and, for that, they had the most diverse motives. They used interpolations, for example, to reinforce the historicity…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 86

Saint John the Evangelist, a painting by the Italian Baroque painter Domenichino. The problem with the splendid Christian art is that the painters have Nordicized the Semites of the 1st century. Had photography existed in the 1st century of our era, the Aryans would never have projected their beautiful physiques on the ugly rabble of…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 76

Below, an abridged translation from the third volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums.   The same as the work of Isaiah, the book of Ezekiel, written almost all in the first person, unites prophecies of misfortunes and beatitudes, reprimands and threats with tempting hymns and omens. For a long time it was considered the…

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Kriminalgeschichte, 66

Sant’Agostino nello studio by Vittore Carpaccio (1502)   ‘Genius in all fields of Christian doctrine’ [Augustine] often dictated at the same time discussions to several writings: 93 works or 232 ‘books’, he says in the year 427 in his Retractationes (which critically contemplate, so to speak, his work in chronological succession), to which we must…

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Why Europeans must reject Christianity, 12

by Ferdinand Bardamu   Christianity: bringer of filth and disease Ecclesiastical censorship and suppression of Western scientific and technical knowledge facilitated the spread and transmission of disease across Europe. This operated in tandem with the Christian denigration of the human body as a vehicle for sin. Instead of searching for the natural causes of disease,…

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Kriminalgeschichte, 45

Below, abridged translation from the first volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums (Criminal History of Christianity)   It was not fought for faith, but for power and for Alexandria The exacerbated interest in faith was not really more than the obverse of the question. From the beginning, this secular dispute was less about dogmatic…

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Kriminalgeschichte, 17

Antonello da Messina Jerome in his study, ca. 1474-1475 National Gallery, London Below, abridged translation from the first volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums (Criminal History of Christianity)   St. Jerome and his ‘cattle for the slaughter of hell’ To the master Jerome, rich in wealth inherited from a noble Catholic household, we can…

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Kriminalgeschichte, 16

Below, translated excerpts from the first volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums (“Criminal History of Christianity”)   The ‘God of peace’ and the ‘children of Satan’ in the fourth century (Pachomius, Epiphanius, Basil, Eusebius, John Chrysostom, Ephraim, Hilary) During the fourth century as divisions and sects grew, the schisms and the heresies developed with…

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Kriminalgeschichte, 12

A month ago I wrote that the oldest Christian texts are a treat if we compare them with the version of Christianity that conquered the United States: the worst Christianity of all times. I also said that it’s the worst precisely because it transmuted the anti-Semitism of the early theologians into the philo-Semitism brought to…

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