The Story of Philosophy, 4

Socrates If we may judge from the bust that has come down to us as part of the ruins of ancient sculpture, Socrates was as far from being handsome as even a philosopher can be. A bald head, a great round face, a deep-set staring eyes, a broad and flowery nose that gave vivid testimony…

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Kriminalgeschichte, 45

Below, abridged translation from the first volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums (Criminal History of Christianity)   It was not fought for faith, but for power and for Alexandria The exacerbated interest in faith was not really more than the obverse of the question. From the beginning, this secular dispute was less about dogmatic…

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Kriminalgeschichte, 40

Below, abridged translation from the first volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums (Criminal History of Christianity)   Christian tall stories Christians, preachers of love of the enemy and of the doctrine that all authority emanates from God, celebrated the death of the emperor with great public banquets, with festivals in churches and chapels and…

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Only six books

Twelve days ago I said that John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty was one of the very few books that, from the academic canon imposed by the faculties of philosophy, I find readable. But I failed to mention the other five. Plato is boring but I find amusing the Memorabilia, in which Xenophon illustrates more piquaresquely…

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Raciology, 1

The Wikipedia article on “scientific racism” has the input of Jews and white liberals, but substantially edited it contains relevant info:   Classical thinkers Benjamin Isaac, in The Invention of Racism in Classical Antiquity (2006), reports that scientific racism is rooted in Greco-Roman antiquity. A prime example is the 5th century BC treatise Airs, Waters,…

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Liberalism, 16

Classical and modern Enlightenment philosophers are given credit for shaping liberal ideas. Thomas Hobbes attempted to determine the purpose and the justification of governing authority in a post-civil war England. Employing the idea of a state of nature—a hypothetical war-like scenario prior to the State—he constructed the idea of a social contract which individuals enter…

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Liberalism, 5

Era of enlightenment The development of liberalism continued throughout the 18th century with the burgeoning Enlightenment ideals of the era. This was a period of profound intellectual vitality that questioned old traditions and influenced several European monarchies throughout the 18th century. In contrast to England, the French experience in the 18th century was characterized by…

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On Buddha & Evola

Or: “The existence of Buddhism should scare the White Nationalists who can’t think of anything but Jews” by Cesar Tort In a previous post I talked about my golden rule: never read those authors or philosophers who write in obscure prose. I confess that, in the past, when I was researching the pseudoscience called psychiatry,…

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