Simian music

“In the long history of mankind there have not been so very many democratic republics, yet people lived for centuries without them and were not always worse off. They even experienced that ‘happiness’ we are forever hearing about, which was sometimes called pastoral or patriarchal… They preserved the physical health of the nation… They preserved…

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On Kenneth Clark’s “Civilisation”

Kenneth Clark may have been clueless about the fact that race matters. Yet, that our rot goes much deeper than what white nationalists realize is all too obvious once we leave, for a while, the ghetto of nationalism and take a look at the classics, just as Clark showed us through his 1969 TV series…

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Civilisation’s “The Light of Experience”

For an introduction to these series, see here. Below, some excerpts of “The Light of Experience,” the eight chapter of Civilisation by Kenneth Clark. Ellipsis omitted between unquoted passages: I am in Holland not only because Dutch painting is a visible expression of this change of mind [the revolution that replaced divine authority by experience,…

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Tom Sunic on Covington’s novels

One must mention the name of Harold A. Covington, a postmodern novelist whose works represent a good Bildungsroman for any White nationalist. Over several thousand pages, Covington uses the classic approach in the description of postmodern heroes who always try to surpass themselves—in the face of cosmic vagaries. However, the plots of his best-known war…

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Civilisation’s “Grandeur and Obedience”

For an introduction to these series, see here. Below, some indented excerpts of “Grandeur and Obedience,” the seventh chapter of Civilisation by Kenneth Clark, and my brief comment. Ellipsis omitted between unquoted passages: In my previous post criticizing Erasmus I mentioned how the modern mind is too coward to approach the main psychosis of Christendom,…

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On Erasmus

When I was a boy I heard of Erasmus and imagined that his famous book was about something like praising so-called “mad” people in a world gone mad. Later, still before reading him, I imagined Erasmus was a great humanist who saw the madness of the religious wars of his time. I was not prepared…

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Best essays on Hitler

Shelter in Fournes ca. 1915 by Hitler Listen here three pieces about Hitler from Counter-Currents Radio. Or if you prefer to skip the music breaks, below the written version of the same essays: William Pierce’s “The Measure of Greatness” Irmin Vinson’s “Some Thoughts on Hitler” Greg Johnson’s “The Burden of Hitler”

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Civilisation’s “Protest and Communication”

For an introduction to these series, see here. Below, some indented excerpts of “Protest and Communication,” the sixth chapter of Civilisation by Kenneth Clark, after which I offer my comments. Ellipsis omitted between unquoted passages: The dazzling summit of human achievement represented by Michelangelo, Raphael and Leonardo da Vinci lasted for less than twenty years.…

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Hitler

The greatest man yet to be born of the modern age has been slandered and vilified to the point where he has become the very symbol of evil. It fills me with despair when I reflect on the fact that the Anglo element of the Germanic population was tricked into sacrificing close to a million…

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Léon Degrelle’s “The Enigma of Hitler”

Léon Degrelle was a Belgian Rexist leader, SS officer, decorated combatant on the Eastern Front. Of the first eight hundred Walloon volunteers who left for the Axis campaign against the Soviet Union and Stalinist Marxism, only three survived the war—one of them Degrelle. He died in 1994, while still in exile in Spain. “Hitler—you knew…

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