The Antichrist § 12

If you stop and think that among almost all peoples the philosopher is just a further development of the priestly type, then this legacy of the priests, the art of falling for your own forgeries, will not seem particularly surprising.

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The Antichrist § 10

Germans understand me immediately when I say that philosophy has been corrupted by theologian blood… What German philosophy really is—an underhanded theology… Why were Germans so convinced that Kant marked a change for the better? The theologian instinct of the German scholar had guessed just what was possible again: a hidden path to the old…

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The Antichrist § 8

  We need to say whom we feel opposed to—theologians and everything with theologian blood in its veins—the whole of our philosophy…

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The Story of Philosophy, 8

Aristotle and Greek science   Under Plato he studied eight—or twenty—years; and indeed the pervasive Platonism of Aristotle’s speculations, even of those most anti-Platonic, suggests the longer period. One would like to imagine these as very happy years: a brilliant pupil guided by an incomparable teacher, walking like Greek lovers in the gardens of philosophy.…

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The Story of Philosophy, 7

To save the white race from extinction it is not enough to start using the Semitic words that our Christian parents instilled in us as insults to Neo-Christian Aryans. We also have to make a destructive critique of what we have inherited from the secular world in the West. I have said that, if theology…

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The Story of Philosophy, 6

The Republic The last words of Will Durant in the previous entry of this series: ‘Let us study The Republic‘. But in this post I will not quote any passage from Durant’s book. I will give my opinion on this classic work that bequeathed us historical Greece. In the first place, it must be recognised…

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The Story of Philosophy, 5

The preparation of Plato Plato’s meeting with Socrates had been a turning point in his life. He had been brought up in comfort, and perhaps in wealth; he was a handsome and vigorous youth—called Plato, it is said, because of the breadth of his shoulders; he had excelled as a soldier, and had twice won…

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The Story of Philosophy, 4

Socrates If we may judge from the bust that has come down to us as part of the ruins of ancient sculpture, Socrates was as far from being handsome as even a philosopher can be. A bald head, a great round face, a deep-set staring eyes, a broad and flowery nose that gave vivid testimony…

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The Story of Philosophy, 3

The context of Plato In 490-470 B. C. Sparta and Athens, forgetting their jealousies and joining their forces, fought off the effort of the Persians under Darius and Xerxes to turn Greece into a colony of an Asiatic empire. In this struggle of youthful Europe against the senile East, Sparta provided the army and Athens…

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The Story of Philosophy, 2

On the uses of philosophy There is a pleasure in philosophy, and a lure even in the mirages of metaphysics, which every student feels until the coarse necessities of physical existence drag him from the heights of thought into the mart of economic strife and gain. Some ungentle reader will check us here by informing…

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